A Brief History of HTML

Brief History of HTTP. HTTP, Chapter 9 Introduction. The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is one of the most ubiquitous and widely adopted application protocols on the Internet: it is the common language between clients and servers, enabling the modern web.

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A brief history of hypertext markup language (HTML) including an overview on the so-called 'browser wars' and the development of XHTML Web Design Stuff. HTML Tutorials CSS Tutorials Web Hosting Resources. Create a Web Page The History of HTML.
A Brief History of HTML and CSS. Home | About Me | History of HTML and History of HTML
Brief History of HTTP. HTTP, Chapter 9 Introduction. The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is one of the most ubiquitous and widely adopted application protocols on the Internet: it is the common language between clients and servers, enabling the modern web.
This chapter tells you something about the Web's early days, HTML, and about the people, companies and organizations who contributed to HTML+, HTML 2, HTML and finally, HTML 4. This chapter is a short history of HTML.
A Brief History of HTML The history of hypertext markup language is a strange and interesting tale. From its simple start as an online subset of SGML through political maneuverings of the huge browser companies to its current piecemeal – but growing – compatibility, the language has weathered a storm of growth, abuse, and innovation.
Introduction

1993 - Present

As the Web grows, so must its vehicle of communication, HTML. The HTML specification was published in November of Since then, the HTML draft specification expired on September 28, , without becoming recommended, but HTML became a W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) recommendation on January 14,

HTML was created in So now there is formatted text with multiple levels of headings and body text. As the saying goes a picture is worth a thousand words. Image tags were added with HTML 2.

How images were presented still very limited. Starting with HTML version 3. By placing images inside data cells and text in adjoining cells you could reliably control the layout of your page.

It no longer ebbed and flowed according to the browser. This combined with font markup inside the table tags page display was more like that of a printed page. The Web Designer was now born. In the early days of the web there were text based browsers. Then Mosiac and other browsers came along that supported the new tags. Accessibility was compromised alt tags have existed as long as there have been images in the spec. Browser interpretation of display code varied and continues to vary greatly.

Those involved with setting web standards — W3C — thought there had to be a better way. They wanted to return to the roots of the Internet and divorce all the presentation from content. The proposal was rejected on the grounds that the proposal conflicted with the previously chosen direction for the Web's evolution; the W3C staff and membership voted to continue developing XML-based replacements instead. The copyright was subsequently amended to be jointly owned by all three vendors, and to allow reuse of the specification.

The WHATWG was based on several core principles, in particular that technologies need to be backwards compatible, that specifications and implementations need to match even if this means changing the specification rather than the implementations, and that specifications need to be detailed enough that implementations can achieve complete interoperability without reverse-engineering each other.

The latter requirement in particular required that the scope of the HTML5 specification include what had previously been specified in three separate documents: It also meant including significantly more detail than had previously been considered the norm. They can be used to define text styles, table sizes, and other aspects of Web pages that previously could only be defined in a page's HTML. CSS helps Web developers create a uniform look across several pages of a Web site.

Instead of defining the style of each table and each block of text within a page's HTML, commonly used styles need to be defined only once in a CSS document. Once the style is defined in cascading style sheet, it can be used by any page that references the CSS file. Plus, CSS makes it easy to change styles across several pages at once. For example, a Web developer may want to increase the default text size from 10pt to 12pt for fifty pages of a Web site. If the pages all reference the same style sheet, the text size only needs to be changed on the style sheet and all the pages will show the larger text.

While CSS is great for creating text styles, it is helpful for formatting other aspects of Web page layout as well. For example, CSS can be used to define the cell padding of table cells, the style, thickness, and color of a table's border, and the padding around images or other objects. This is why most Web pages today incorporate cascading style sheets. CSS is an open, independent and freely usable standard. This is being done in accordance with W3C rules.

CSS comes in different versions. CSS level 1 was released in , and republished with corections in CSS level 2 adds support for different output media. CSS 3 is currently in development and will be split up in modules. The idea behind it was to seperate presentation and content of a web site. The advantage of this approach is that updates and changes to the presentation need only be applied once to the stylesheet to affect all pages.

Especially large sites can achieve significant time savings. HTML has reached the end of it's shelf life and is not being developed further.

A Brief History of HTML - Present. The first version of HTML was written by Tim Berners-Lee in Since then, there have been many different versions of HTML. The most widely used version throughout the 's was HTML , which became an official standard in December Another version, XHTML, was a rewrite of HTML as an XML language. XML is a standard markup language . A Brief History of HTML The history of hypertext markup language is a strange and interesting tale. From its simple start as an online subset of SGML through political maneuverings of the huge browser companies to its current piecemeal – but growing – compatibility, the language has weathered a storm of growth, abuse, and innovation. As the Web grows, so must its vehicle of communication, HTML. The HTML specification was published in November of Since then, the HTML draft specification expired on September 28, , without becoming recommended, but HTML became a W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) recommendation on January 14,

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